Tag Archives: Mineral County

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist: January 2019 Edition

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist Cover 2019

Another year has passed and a surprising number of taxa (species, varieties, and subspecies) have been added to Plants of the Bodie Hills: an Annotated Checklist — about 50! Some of these are new finds in the field; some are new records in the on-line herbarium databases. Some of these are definite new additions; some are in the “maybe” category. The total count is now about 750 taxa.

Other changes in this year’s edition include the addition of keys to selected genera, and additions to the map on the last page (or back cover, if it’s printed 2-sided).

CLICK HERE to visit the Downloads page. The January 2019 edition of the checklist is a 64-page, 6.1 mb PDF file.

Here’s a selection of favorite plants seen during visits to the Bodie Hills in 2018:

Eriogonum caespitosum

Matted wild buckwheat: Eriogonum caespitosum

Eriogonum maculatum

Spotted wild buckwheat: Eriogonum maculatum

Salvia dorrii

Dorr’s sage: Salvia dorrii

Thelypodium laciniatum

Feathery thelypodium: Thelypodium laciniatum

Allium anceps

Twin leaved onion: Allium anceps

Angelica capitellata

Ranger’s buttons or Swamp white heads: Angelica capitellata
with lots of visiting insects.

Astragalus curvicarpus

Curvepod milkvetch: Astragalus curvicarpus

Rosa woodsii

Woods rose: Rosa woodsii subsp. ultramontana


Copyright © Tim Messick 2019. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist: January 2018 Edition

I’ve made a bunch more corrections and additions to Plants of the Bodie Hills: an Annotated Checklist, based on fieldwork and other research during 2017. CLICK HERE to visit the Downloads page. The January 2018 edition of the checklist is a 50-page, 8.1 mb PDF file.

The Bodie Hills encompass about 417 square miles in northern Mono County, California, western Mineral County, Nevada, and southern-most Lyon County, Nevada. This checklist now includes 701 taxa (species, subspecies, or varieties). Of these, 593 are definitely known to occur in the Bodie Hills and 108 are of uncertain status in the area (quite possibly present, but not yet confirmed). Altogether, there are 558 dicots (in 53 families), 130 monocots (in 15 families), and 13 vascular cryptogams (in 8 families).

Some places in the Bodie Hills worth visiting:

Chemung Lake

Chemung Lake, Chemung Mine, and Masonic Mountain

Upper end of Mormon Meadow

The upper end of Mormon Meadow

East Side of the Bodie Hills

The northeastern Bodie Hills, along the Sweetwater-Aurora Road

Road to Aurora

The road to Aurora

Bridgeport Canyon

Bridgeport Canyon

Mt Biedeman and storm

Mt. Biedeman from the road to Bodie

 


Copyright © Tim Messick 2018. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST

Fun with iNaturalist

I’ve started uploading some observations of plants and occasional other critters to iNaturalist.org. iNaturalist is a project of the California Academy of Sciences that serves as an on-line place “where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world”.

For me, iNaturalist is one more place (aside from the Consortium of California Herbaria, Intermountain Regional Herbarium Network, and CalFlora) where I can see what others are finding in the Bodie Hills, Hot Springs Valley, and other places I like to visit. It’s also a way to get acquainted with some invertebrates and other organisms that I don’t have the training to identify easily myself. You can also help other people identify what they’ve observed, ask for help identifying some of your observations, create “Places” (like the Bodie Hills) as geographic filters for lists of observations, and follow or communicate with other observers. There’s also an app that lets you record observations in the field.

There are a few drawbacks — photos don’t always capture the characters needed for accurate identification, and an observation may get labeled “research grade” even if two people agree on the same identification that happens to be incorrect. On the whole, though, the community of observers (a mix of amateurs and professionals) seems to get things right, providing a useful and user-friendly addition to the knowledge-base on biodiversity.

The project is still young and it will be interesting to watch it grow in the years ahead. iNaturalist began as a student’s final project in the UC Berkeley School of Information in 2008. It was acquired by Cal Academy in 2014 and has a small staff supporting the project. Do you have photos of identifiable biota in Mono County or anywhere else in the world? Share them on iNaturalist!

 


Copyright © Tim Messick 2017. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST