Tag Archives: Nevada

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist: January 2019 Edition

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist Cover 2019

Another year has passed and a surprising number of taxa (species, varieties, and subspecies) have been added to Plants of the Bodie Hills: an Annotated Checklist — about 50! Some of these are new finds in the field; some are new records in the on-line herbarium databases. Some of these are definite new additions; some are in the “maybe” category. The total count is now about 750 taxa.

Other changes in this year’s edition include the addition of keys to selected genera, and additions to the map on the last page (or back cover, if it’s printed 2-sided).

CLICK HERE to visit the Downloads page. The January 2019 edition of the checklist is a 64-page, 6.1 mb PDF file.

Here’s a selection of favorite plants seen during visits to the Bodie Hills in 2018:

Eriogonum caespitosum

Matted wild buckwheat: Eriogonum caespitosum

Eriogonum maculatum

Spotted wild buckwheat: Eriogonum maculatum

Salvia dorrii

Dorr’s sage: Salvia dorrii

Thelypodium laciniatum

Feathery thelypodium: Thelypodium laciniatum

Allium anceps

Twin leaved onion: Allium anceps

Angelica capitellata

Ranger’s buttons or Swamp white heads: Angelica capitellata
with lots of visiting insects.

Astragalus curvicarpus

Curvepod milkvetch: Astragalus curvicarpus

Rosa woodsii

Woods rose: Rosa woodsii subsp. ultramontana


Copyright © Tim Messick 2019. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST

Plants of the Bodie Hills Checklist: January 2018 Edition

I’ve made a bunch more corrections and additions to Plants of the Bodie Hills: an Annotated Checklist, based on fieldwork and other research during 2017. CLICK HERE to visit the Downloads page. The January 2018 edition of the checklist is a 50-page, 8.1 mb PDF file.

The Bodie Hills encompass about 417 square miles in northern Mono County, California, western Mineral County, Nevada, and southern-most Lyon County, Nevada. This checklist now includes 701 taxa (species, subspecies, or varieties). Of these, 593 are definitely known to occur in the Bodie Hills and 108 are of uncertain status in the area (quite possibly present, but not yet confirmed). Altogether, there are 558 dicots (in 53 families), 130 monocots (in 15 families), and 13 vascular cryptogams (in 8 families).

Some places in the Bodie Hills worth visiting:

Chemung Lake

Chemung Lake, Chemung Mine, and Masonic Mountain

Upper end of Mormon Meadow

The upper end of Mormon Meadow

East Side of the Bodie Hills

The northeastern Bodie Hills, along the Sweetwater-Aurora Road

Road to Aurora

The road to Aurora

Bridgeport Canyon

Bridgeport Canyon

Mt Biedeman and storm

Mt. Biedeman from the road to Bodie

 


Copyright © Tim Messick 2018. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST

More Great Plants in the Northern Bodie Hills

The previous post focused on some plants that were new or confirmed additions to the Bodie Hills flora. Here are some more wonderful plants, already known to occur in the range, that were a pleasure to see along the northern edge of the Bodie Hills.

Balsamorhiza

Balsamorhiza

This sunny Balsam-root (Balsamorhiza) was in a small gully along Dead Ox Pitch, that steep grade just west of “The Elbow” in the East Walker River. The pinnatifid leaves with crenate margins and the fruity-aromatic, sticky-glandular puberulence all up and down the flower stalks and leaves lead one to B. hirsuta in the Jepson e-Flora key. In the Intermountain Flora, however, Arthur Cronquist argues for including this in the widespread and variable Hooker’s balsamroot, as B. hookeri var. hirsuta.


Allium anceps

Twin leaved onion (Allium anceps) was very common in some areas among scattered low sagebrush along the road heading south to Masonic.


Eriogonum ovalifolium

Cushion wild buckwheat (Eriogonum ovalifolium var. ovalifolium) is scattered among sagebrush throughout the area.


Nama

Ground nama or Purple nama (Nama aretioides) is a small clumping annual with flowers that are under a centimeter across. What the flowers lack in size, they make up for in color saturation.


Cymopterus globosus Cymopterus globosus

Globose cymopterus (Cymopterus globosus) is an odd member of the umbel (or carrot or celery) family, with an inflorescence shaped more like a golf ball than the rays of an umbrella.


Astragalus malacusAstragalus malacus

Astragalus is a large and diverse genus of legumes in which many species are difficult to key out. Woolly milkvetch (Astragalus malacus) is an exception—easily recognized by the long, spreading hairs, especially on its fruits.


Viola purpurea

A violet with bright yellow flowers would seem to be misnamed as Viola purpurea, but the epithet refers to the purplish color on the back sides of all or most petals. One of many subspecies, this is Viola purpurea subsp. aurea, the Golden violet.


Mimulus nanus

The Skunky monkey flower (Mimulus nanus var. mephiticus) emits a slight skunk-like (mephitic) odor, but the flowers are so small, you have to get your nose very close to notice it. These are a couple of very robust plants, growing in sandy soil beside a sagebrush after an unusually wet winter.


Copyright © Tim Messick 2017. All rights reserved.
DOWNLOAD THE CHECKLIST